Job Search Focus for Success: Know What You Do NOT Want in a Job

Job Search Focus for Success: Know What You Do NOT Want in a Job

Rather than start with what you do want in a future executive position, a different tactic may be to identify all of the functions you definitely do not want in a future position. Thus, your job search excludes all of the elements of a job that you do not want to have.

Identify what you do not want in your next role to focus your job search.

Identify what you do not want in your next role to focus your job search.

In this employment economy, there is no be-all, know-all, do-all executive. While you need to be flexible about the work you will take on and certainly expand your role once you are in a position, you will not be interviewed, much less be selected for hire, if your unique selling proposition is that you can do anything. Read on to learn how to create effective parameters that efficiently focus your job search.

Think of the Venn diagram about which we all learned in junior high school math: It has three or four overlapping circles that identify sets of elements. Some elements are in all sets, and some are in just one. Think about your potential future jobs like these overlapping circles. Are the positions you have chosen very much alike? If so, your circles overlap significantly. If they do not overlap, then you have a complex process of elimination before you. You need to identify exactly what you do not want in a position, those deal-killing job functions that fit into only one of the circles. These roles are ones you can eliminate.

Now look at the positions you have left. Are all of these ideal for you? Do they overlap? By how much? The less they overlap, the more pruning you have to do to home in on your perfect role. Determine which of the remaining job characteristics, perhaps the ones that fall into two job types, you can cut from will become your short list. By this point, you should have a tightly nested or overlapping set of circles representing a very sharply focused set of job titles.

With this renewed focus, which effectively eliminated the types of roles you would never find yourself assuming, you can now write an executive resume and craft an executive job search that positions you 100% to one target. The benefits of this approach are many; the most important is that if you position yourself correctly, you will be able to market yourself so compellingly for specific job functions in specific industries/company types/geographies, and so on, that a future hiring leader cannot help but recognize the solution to his problems in your candidacy.

Need to know more about focusing your job search? Five Strengths can help.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Amy L Adler markets senior executives with persuasive executive resume writing, compelling LinkedIn profile development, and masterful job search coaching, so they can identify and obtain the executive career of their dreams.