7 Interview Fails that Won’t Get You the Job

How to Blow Your Interview: 7 Interview Fails that Won’t Get You the Job

We all hope to leave an impression when we walk out of a job interview. We want the prospective employer to remember us. But the question is, what kind of impression do we really leave behind? Read on to get some tips on what you do not want to be remembered for.

What NOT to Say: Don’t Do these Interview Fails

We work hard to get our foot in the door and have that chance to actually show an employer who we are and what we have to offer. With that in mind, there is nothing worse than blowing that opportunity by having a less than impressive interview. Not only will we miss out on the opportunity that we were applying for, but with Networking as it is, we run the risk of getting a “bad name.” Here are some examples of what not to say in that situation to ensure this doesn’t happen to you.

The right answers will make or break your interview. Don't blow it!!

The right answers will make or break your interview. Don’t blow it!!

  • Tell me about your strengths?

Don’t answer with something simple like, I am a hard worker, I like to learn, etc. You don’t want to be vague and boring. They really want to know what specifically makes you a strong candidate for the position, talk about those exact skills instead of being general and non-specific.

  • Tell me about a weakness?

Don’t be silly with this question, it matters. Don’t blush or stammer, be prepared. They also don’t want an arrogant employee; do not say that you don’t have any weaknesses. We all do and they know that! Also don’t be over-indulging with phrases like; I don’t know how to pick just one. That is just scary. Shoot for somewhere in the middle. Pick a weakness, but offer a solution with it. Something like, in the past I have tried to help others in the workplace get along and finish projects, etc. Although this can be a good thing, I have learned at times it is often wiser to prioritize and handle myself and projects well first before worrying about outside issues.

  • What do you know about our company?

This is often a kick- off question and can be easy if you are properly prepared. Saying something like, I hear you pay well will prove to be a costly mistake. Also, avoid answering with things like, I saw you were hiring so I thought I would check things out. You also don’t want to look as if you are there spur of the moment and have no information. You are capable and valuable and therefore you have options. Because of this fact, you have, of course, done your homework and should have plenty of information about the company and position.

  • Do you work well with others?

This is not an opening to explain how you struggled in your last position but you are sure that it was because your co-workers were intimidated by you. Don’t do it! Trust me; this is not what they want to hear. Do not bad mouth past bosses or fellow employees, it will get you nowhere. No employer wants to hire someone that is difficult to work with. If you give them reason to worry about your social skills, chances are you won’t be hired on.

  • Why would you like to work here?

It is just a short drive from my home. Ouch! Not good enough. Hearing that a job is “convenient” for you is not going to leave a positive impression. Irrelevant information, such as being excited about employee discounts or benefits, is not helpful. This is a better place to offer some kind words about the company, the people and its reputation. Leave it at that.

  • Do you have any questions for me?

How about, how much vacation time would I get? Or would I have to work overtime? These are equally as bad as saying that you don’t have any questions for them. You should ask some questions that actually relate to the position or what you would be doing on a daily basis. Asking about the benefits of the position can be done after you have an offer.

A Little Common Sense

Remember, there are plenty of ways to ruin an interview and annoy an interviewer. With a little time, practice and preparation you can avoid doing just that. Bad responses in an interview can truly damage your chances of a call back or even a position in your field. Tread carefully and think things through. You will surely be remembered for the good impression you make.

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
By Brandy Higginson, Five Strengths Contributor

Amy L Adler markets senior executives with persuasive executive resume writing, compelling LinkedIn profile development, and masterful job search coaching, so they can identify and obtain the executive career of their dreams.

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